Inside Legendary Model Kate Moss's London Home

Kate Moss isn’t exactly famous for being a morning person, so the fact that the master bath in her London home is inspired by dusk is rather fitting. “It’s my favorite time of day,” coos the legendary model and night owl, slinking about the grisaille-enveloped space in a short silk kimono. “Picture a summer night when it goes silvery-blue from the light of the moon,” she continues.

Nearly three decades in front of a ­camera lens have given Moss a rich photographic library—which comes in handy with respect to more than just her iconic way of putting clothes together. Her interior-design style is equally innate. Eclectic, too: “I love mixing old and new things, all different eras.” While she collaborates on her homes with interior designer Katie Grove—incidentally, her ­former personal assistant—she cops to being very hands-on.

“I don’t want to say I’m a control freak, but I’m a control freak,” Moss says, erupting into a raspy laugh. When it comes to social media, though, she admits to being somewhat clueless. "Thank God I’ve got a teenage daughter—she keeps me up to speed, or I wouldn’t know anything!"

To capture the mood of “a solarized Man Ray picture,” as she describes it, Moss teamed up with bespoke-wallpaper house de Gournay to create a silver-tinted ­anemone pattern (according to Greek mythology, the flower is thought to ­symbolize luck). The result of an intimate design process, Anemones in Light depicts cascading blooms overlapping shards of solar radiance, and will become part of de Gournay’s permanent collection. “I’ve always loved what they do. It’s like vintage jewelry—it’s special,” she says, adding that a powder room in her country house is done in their Badminton design, incorporating jaybirds to mimic the chirping variety that inhabit her garden there.

"I wanted that kind of film noir feel in here."

The new paper provides the perfect backdrop for the glamorously appointed master bath. Centered in the space is a claw-foot tub, set beneath a vintage crystal chandelier from James Worrall and placed opposite a carved stone hearth. You can just imagine it burning with a fire in the winter while Moss soaks in a hot bath filled with her ­signature blend of Santa Maria Novella carnation oil and magnesium flakes, which she says “take the edge off.” Elsewhere, there’s a mirrored vanity lined with antique ­perfume bottles and a wall of framed black-and-white ­photographs, including a diamond-dust Elvis, Elizabeth Taylor, David Bowie, and a triptych of Moss with Alexander McQueen (the late designer was a close friend). Embroidered silver curtains made from saris are draped at the windows. “So no one can see into the bathroom, thank goodness,” Moss notes, adding that parties have been known to spill over to this part of the house.

De Gournay’s hand-painted Anemones on custom Xuan paper in dusk covers her master bath, where an Irving Penn portrait of the model sits above a mirrored-and-stone hearth, behind a claw-foot tub by Drummonds. 

De Gournay’s hand-painted Anemones on custom Xuan paper in dusk covers her master bath, where an Irving Penn portrait of the model sits above a mirrored-and-stone hearth, behind a claw-foot tub by Drummonds. 

"I love those old movies with glamorous bathrooms where they have chaise longues. My bathroom in the ­country has a chesterfield, and when I have my birthday parties there, we always end up hanging out in it,” Moss explains. “It’s got a record player, it’s cozy, it’s fun—there’s potions and lotions and smelly things. Everyone’s welcome.”

Her guests in the country will soon have some new wall candy to admire as well. Moss designed a daybreak version of Anemones in Light for her bathroom there (it also adorns a hallway in her London home). “I like the feeling of when the sun is just coming up at a [music] festival, and you have that glowy light,” she says. “This one is pastels and neons—quite psychedelic.” In other words, perfectly Kate Moss.

Original article by Architectural Digest. Text by Jane Keltner de Valle. Photography by Simon Brown and Nikolai Von Bismarck.